February 19, 2016

Poetry Friday--Found Object Poems Part II

I have illustrated two more of the "Found Object" poems I wrote for Laura Shovan's challenge this week. It was a fun week of photos to work from.

Day 17 was written in the spirit of Valentine's Day. It probably makes no sense without the inspiration photo, so head over to Laura's blog where she has the whole week of prompts posted.


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

For Day 18 I used a photo of the Claes Oldenburg sculpture, "Typewriter Eraser, Scale X," that is in the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden in Washington, D. C. I removed the background. For a new background, I added an old typewritten itinerary to go with the "trip" theme.

About a dozen years ago my daughter and I went to D. C. and did the touristy stuff. What a surprise it was to come upon the giant eraser! This poem is semi-based upon that experience.


© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Donna at Mainely Write is playing hostess to the Round-Up for today. You're in for a treat because she has outdone herself with an uplifting rhyming poem titled "Halfway to Somewhere."




29 comments:

  1. These illustrations are so much fun, Diane. The eraser is a thing of the past. Good thing it is preserved, in all its weirdness, as a giant sculpture.

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    1. Thanks, Laura! Art can be so startling and unexpected.

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  2. "Darned if I know." ...Thanks for the reminder of things perhaps best left as nameless memories...I love that your font looked produced by the typewriter described as one of the old-time implements. ...At first glance and read, the flip-flop poem is deceptively flippant; I needed to read it more than once to fully appreciate it--to fully absorb the full depth and impact. Thank you for sharing your two masterfully written and illustrated poems. God bless you!

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    1. But sometimes those "nameless memories" drive you crazy when you try to recall the names and can't.

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  3. Both of these are really fun poems, and I love your embellishments! I am glad that the twin refused to be refuse. Well played!

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    1. The embellishments are fun to find, too.

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  4. I love what you did with both, Diane. The first one needs to read twice, to be sure one knows just who is speaking, so funny. And there are those erasers on sale on Ebay. I thought they were very cool, but they didn't work very well, & tore a lot of paper! FYI-I didn't find a name either.

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    1. I'm glad you couldn't find a name, either. I think we have to settle for "eraser."

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  5. Diane, I love your backgrounds on the poems you wrote this week. Great enhancements - very creative.

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    1. Ha, ha! I think you mean the backgrounds are in-you-face PINK and blue. ;-)

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  6. Every time I see your creations on images, I want to jump in and give it a go. You make it look easy and seamless, but experience tells me it's not. That funny wayward flip-flop and the intriguing blast-from-the-past eraser have inspired some way-out creative work.

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    1. Do jump in! It's fun. It takes a bit of practice, but it doesn't cost a thing in the way of materials!

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  7. The industry of writing has certainly changed since I scratched my first verses into a lined notebook years and years ago. My pencil had a tiny eraser, like a top hat, showing wear and tear of indecision. Now, no one can see my forward and backward progress. :-) Words are still the same, though. Great poem! I like the shoe, too. ;-)

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    1. There also used to be ink erasers in pencil form with a little brush where you'd normally find an eraser. I wonder what happened to all those businesses that made typewriter/ink erasers back in the day?

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  8. One thing that's great about both of these are the details. You've gotten very clever to include them in both words, like the wordplay in the first poem, and pictures, like the eraser marks on the p and the e. I'm trying to think what I used to type my papers in college. By my senior year it was a clunky desktop, but before that, I think it was something in between a typewriter and computer. A "word processor" I think it was called.

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    1. Before my first desktop, I had a little word processor. At an office I worked in for a dozen years, we also had a word processor, but it was humongous, and, when I first started, teletype machines!

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  9. What fun. I love that the mate refused to be refuse. And yes, I think I had one of those rolling erasers.

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    1. I remember when everyone thought correction tape was the "cat's pajamas"!

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  10. I love your quirky sense of humor, Diane. Both of these made me smile today -- I'd almost forgotten about those round erasers.

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  11. Love your "love" poem, Diane! I was telling my daughters that we used to call flip-flops "zories" back in the day and they thought I was nuts. "refused to become refuse" too funny! Thanks for the smile. =)

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    1. We used to call flip-flops thongs! That was before those ridiculous undies became popular.

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  12. The shoe poem is so clever! And I remember those giant erasers with the brushes!

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    1. And do you remember carbon paper? What a pain that was. Later, in the late 60s, early 70s, photostat machines started making their way into businesses and libraries. They used thermal paper that came in rolls and when copies came out of the machine, they tended to roll up!

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    2. And that thermal paper had a peculiar smell.

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  13. Diane, I think your "Field Trip to the Past" is fabulous. And the artful pairing of your poem, with the erased & typed over letters is just too perfect.

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    1. Thanks, Jan! This is one subject for which it helps to be old!

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