May 11, 2017

Poetry Friday--Not a Mass Poetry Festival Review

I had all intentions of posting a review of last weekend's Mass Poetry Festival, but I just couldn't get it together for this week. Maybe next week...

For today, I have a woodcut project poem from my ongoing series. The poems use woodcut illustrations found in Chap-Books of the Eighteenth Century. I'm still playing with the cherita form. (Cherita is a mini-poem of three stanzas. The first is one line long and sets a scene. The second and third stanzas are two and three lines and tell a story.)

© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Text:

mid-May afternoon

birds in territorial
disputes

the newly coupled
unaware there
are birds

Be sure to head over to A Teaching Life where Tara is the Round-Up hostess with the mostess.

16 comments:

  1. How oblivious we can be to the beauty around us sometimes. 😉 The cherita is like an arrow, sleek & powerful. Nicely done!

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  2. I like this form. You've really brought out the details of the woodcut nicely. Look at all those birds!

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  3. I'm finding love in this spring air in quite a few places. Nice to see your cherita story, Diane.

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  4. What a fun poem to go with the woodcut. Yes, love can make us oblivious. My daughter is in that state now!

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  5. We've been having a few avian territorial disputes outside our window, usually early in the morning - I wish we could be that oblivious, but boy oh boy, they have a talented for making their squawks known by all! :)

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  6. The cherita is such a lovely form and you've done a wonderful job with your words and graphics (as usual). I love the sweet sentiment -- falling in love, only having eyes for each other. :)

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  7. Diane, this is one of those images that you have to observe closely to gather all of the intent of your wonderful poem. Thank you for sharing the poem format with me. Your last line opens up another story. Please consider offering this one (and others) for my spring gallery.

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  8. Blissfully unaware! Haven't we all been there at one time or another? Then the squawking and pecking begins. ;)

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  9. They are thinking about other things at the moment, but will one day get to focus on the world around them. Thank you for this! -- Christie @ https://wonderingandwondering.wordpress.com/blog/

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  10. For the Haiku Queen, the cherita seems a natural choice for a new form to try - and I love this blissfully unaware couple! I'll need to try my hand at one of these some day.

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  11. Thank you for sharing a new form for me to try. I love the wood blocks.

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  12. Unaware! There's conflict above and the potential for splatting missiles...but love results in blissful blindness!!

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  13. Oh, wow! That's so cool. I love the image paired with this poem. I tried a Cherita this week because I learned of the form last week from you and loved it. I'll share soon. You inspire me.

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  14. Enjoyed this, Diane. There was a couple near me at the airport yesterday who managed to catch their flight, but was otherwise quite unaware of their surroundings.
    So glad that you are doing this project and spotlighting these woodcuts.

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  15. Cherita sounds like an interesting poem form to try out. And this young couple is so enraptured with each other, they might want to watch out for those birds. Your image reminds me of Medieval art that I just saw at the Chicago Art Institute today.

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