September 4, 2014

Poetry Friday--"Little Shaver"

Caption: A Little "Shaver," Indianapolis Newsboy, 41 inches high. Said he was 6 years old. Aug., 1908. Wit., E. N. Clopper. Location: Indianapolis, Indiana. Photo taken August 1908 by Lewis Wickes Hine, courtesy Library of Congress.

Little Shaver

When I get bigger I'm
going to be a barber.
A barber makes people
look good, smell good,
and willing to part with
two pennies for a paper.
And another one for me.

© Diane Mayr, all rights reserved.

Laura at Author Amok is doing Poetry Friday Round-Up duty this week--stop by!

28 comments:

  1. Very nice! Touching, but with a light hand.

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    1. I'm happy my hand is light enough--sometimes it feels a little heavy. (Come back next Friday to see what I mean!)

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  2. Adorable little smile on that face -- and the bare feet. These poems and photos feel like windows into a lost world.

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    1. I love the idea that despite everything, the child still looks happy!

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  3. I agree with Laura that you are opening windows here. Thanks for the glimpse of this little cutie.

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    1. I hope he had a long and prosperous life.

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  4. Love it! It's just a perfect poem for the photo!

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  5. I love these poems, Diane, makes me care for children working still today. Love the title!

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    1. Depressing to know that there are still children who must work to help their family survive.

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  6. Diane, you captured the voice of this little aspiring shaver. I agree that your series gives us insight into a past world.

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    1. That was my intent, especially for kids who have no clue how hard their great-great-great grandparents had to work.

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  7. What a cutie. There's something about the play between the innocent voices you create for these kids and their sometimes sad circumstances that resonates so well. I'm enjoying all these glimpses of the past.

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    1. Thanks, Jama, I'd like to think that kids are able to survive circumstances and still be able to smile.

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  8. He's so tiny! These photos and your poems are amazing - voices from more than 100 years ago reverberating today. = )

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    1. Really, you have to wonder how they handled money, being so young and small.

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  9. LOVE this series, Diane - these poems have just the perfect mix of authentic voice, and the pathos behind the story, the smile, the bravado.

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    1. The series winds down soon. Next week and the week after, and then I'm through for the Sketchbook Project. I wouldn't mind writing a few more poems and making it into a "real" book.

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  10. Yes, hear, hear for this series. And look - that paper is almost as big as he is! Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Yes, it is! Can you imagine how dirty he got each day from the newsprint?

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  11. I noticed the "newsie" wasn't wearing shoes. True of many children at that time. I liked your poem exceedingly.

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    1. The thought makes me queasy! Look at the horse in the background...

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  12. Thanks for bringing the past to life!

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    1. I'd like to think I've been called to do so.

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  13. Such a captivating photo - I love that you wrote a poem for him. :-)

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    1. Thanks for stopping by Holly, click on the Sketchbook Project label to see more of Hine's photos.

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  14. You sure have been prolific with this project, Diane! I love how you've channeled each of these children and have given them new life.

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    1. Two more Fridays--the poems are written and ready to go, so make sure you come back!

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