July 15, 2016

Poetry Friday--Bun Haibun and Bun Haiku

As hinted at last Friday, I have some bunny haiku! There are quite a bit it seems due to the rabbit's role as Easter symbol, but I've left out the holiday ones.

June 7, 2010:



March 10, 2012:

early spring...
a rabbit where the garden
used to be


This one I wrote last year after attending a Red Sox game in Boston. We parked near the Pru and walked to Fenway. On the way I was totally surprised to see baby rabbits! In the middle of the city!

July 29, 2015:

church in the city
behind the iron fence
three rabbit kits


For today, in response to last week's positive reaction to my haibun, I've written another:
Cultivation

My idea of caring for a yard is to allow it to return to nature. Unfortunately, the tired old lawn does need mowing if I'm not to be condemned by the town. Aside from that, though, it's benign neglect all the way. As a result I've got bizarre weeds and bushes that have taken root. My backyard has become a haven of sorts for a variety of suburban creatures. A woodchuck family has maintained a network of tunnels for a number of years. I have chipmunks, squirrels, and rabbits as permanent residents. The occasional skunk or turkey passes through. Something that I hadn't heard before last year was a tree frog. It's back this year to brighten my evenings.

my door opens...
the crisscrossing paths
of two cottontails

The following is an image that contains a rabbit, but no poem. It was submitted as an art inspiration piece for a Spark challenge in 2015. It is titled, "Crepuscular."



Head over to A Year of Reading where Mary Lee is hosting the Round-Up.

20 comments:

  1. Thanks for a hoppin' good post this week!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your words entered my crepuscular state, eyes at half mast, thoughts bobbing in slight waves of poetry, like a student sailboat, anchored by shore and half-dozing. Now bunnies are hopping and thoughts are nibbled up. Perhaps a nap is on-coming.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A nap is almost always welcomed in my life!

      Delete
  3. Diane, you opened your home to a variety of critters and adorned it with poetry. I was in Boston last weekend as you know but saw no out of place animals in the streets. I enjoyed your treats this week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you had a good time in Boston! Or at the very least, educational! ;-)

      Delete
  4. Rabbits are destroying my garden...but I love when they show up in your poetry, Diane!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry about your garden. I was told that the Shakers always planted with the idea that 1/3 would go for the critters, 1/3 would be sold, and 1/3 would be for themselves.

      Delete
  5. I enjoyed hopping around your writing today.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Margaret, and I've been enjoying the reports of your visit to Africa.

      Delete
  6. I thoroughly enjoyed the bunny haiku, Diane, and I especially liked March 10th's. Thanks for a delightful romp.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Bunnies & squirrels are everywhere here, and I would love to see a chipmunk. "a rabbit where the garden used to be" is apt. Fun to think of your wild garden inviting the little ones to feast and move in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, I hate to think of the way little creatures get pushed out by development. But, they do adapt--probably better than we would!

      Delete
  8. Crepuscule was my French teacher's favorite word. I love your bunnies! We have several around here . . . they demolished the raised bed that had carrots but have left the strawberries and summer plants alone. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Your post made me hoppy! Love the image, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The image is adapted from an old Japanese brocade sample from the Library of Congress.

      Delete
  10. Love me some bunnies, Diane! I've lived this one (unfortunately):
    "early spring...
    a rabbit where the garden
    used to be"

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love that first one about "where the garden used to be" so much! I love to garden and I love the creatures coming to my yard. I like the way the Shakers planned. I think that nature belongs to all of us, even our gardens. Why not expect a tax?

    ReplyDelete